Episode 264: Bad Timing - A Sensual Obsession

Special Guests: Nicolas Roeg, Yale Udoff, Anthony Lawson
Guest Co-Hosts: Elric Kane, Adam Long

Nicolas Roeg's Bad Timing tells the story of two people, Alex Linden (Art Garfunkel) and Milena Flaherty (Theresa Russell), who get together when maybe they shouldn't have.

Guests include director Nic Roeg, screenwriter , and editor Tony Lawson.

Elric Kane of Killer POV and Adam Long of Movie Geeks United join Mike to discuss this sensual obsession.

Listen/Download Now:


Links:
Buy Bad Timing on DVD
Buy The World is Ever Changing by Nicolas Roeg
Visit the official Yale Udoff website
Read Nicolas Roeg/Chromatic Cartography by Andrew Mark Patch
Follow Theresa Russell on Twitter
Visit the official Art Garfunkel website
Here more of Elric Kane at Killer POV
Hear more of Adam Long at WGWG
Read more of Adam Long via Focus Newspaper

Music:
"The Koln Concert" - Keith Jarrett
"Invitation to the Blues" - Tom Waits
"No One Else" - Weezer
"Carnival" - Siouxsie & The Banshees
"Piggy in the Mirror" - The Cure
"The Spy" - The Doors

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1 comment:

  1. The Foreign ViewerMay 5, 2016, 11:04:00 AM

    Good show, Mike. Both of your co-hosts had something to add and you can tell that all three of you really enjoyed analyzing this one.

    I've never heard of Lüscher color test before and you're right - it does give you some interesting results.

    As for the movie, I've seen it as a teen and it left a mark. I was channel surfing when I caught it and I had no idea what it was about (thought it's a crime mystery with some eroticism) or who Roeg is, but it starred the always risque Theresa Russell and Garfunkel's stunt casting was a point of curiosity as well (and having Keitel show up too was just a bonus). And the movie was something, alright. Sure, the peculiar acting, characters, plot and themes left an impression, but THAT scene pretty much dwarfs the rest of the movie. I've never seen "Cosby action" before and for some dumb reason never took something like that as seriously as actual rape. Man, did this movie change my mind on that, 180. That scene disturbed me and I still remember the movie, even though I haven't seen it since.

    As for the cast, I'd say that Garfunkel's performance could be best described as effective rather than good, Keitel didn't have that much to do but his foreboding presence compensated for that and Russell was the right stuff. It's sad that unless they're fans of 70s and 80s thrillers or arthouse stuff (and this falls a bit into that category), people probably don't even know who she is. I've even heard someone referring to her as "bargain bin Kathleen Turner" which is just wrong. Anyway, this movie probably wouldn't work as well without this cast.

    It's fantastic that you've managed to get an interview with Mr. Roeg! Unfortunately, I could barely understand what he was saying. It might be due to English being my second language or maybe your or his phone/Skype connection was simply bad. Either way, that's why I'm glad you interviewed Udoff as well.

    I've seen many of Roeg's films now and while I don't particularity like some of them, I'm always curious to see more, since you never know what will happen next or who will show up in them and there's usually always something memorable about them. He was definitely the star of the 70s and somewhat the 80s and this film was without a doubt among his strongest work. That's why I can't tell if the fact that according to the imdb his last directorial job was on The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones: Demons of Deception is sad or awesome.

    Castaway might be my favorite of his films (and not just because of gorgeous Amanda Donohoe and great eccentric performance by Mr. Reed).

    What's also impressive about Roeg besides his work as a director is his work as the camera man/cinematographer before he hit it big. He worked both on schlock and artsy epics like Zhivago.

    Anyway, pretty good show Mike and if you ever decide to take topic suggestions, I'd love to hear a show about Castaway (even if it's just a segment in some larger episode about Roeg's best known works like the Walkabout).

    By the way Mike, if this movie was a question on Jeopardy, which category it'd be in? "What are Bill Cosby's favorite films", of course.

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