Episode 305: Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970)

Special Guest: Doyle Green, Dolly Read-Martin, Marcia McBroom, John Lazar, Erica Gavin, Stu Phillips, Lynn Carey
Guest Co-Host: Heather Drain, Jordan Blossey

Russ Meyer's first of two films for 20th Century Fox is a swinging quasi-sequel to Jacqueline Susann's tawdry Valley of the Dolls. Written by , Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970) tells the tale of a female rock group who move out to Hollywood only to find it a cess-pool of broken dreams where only the strong and pure of heart survive.

Interviews include Doyle Green (Lips, Hits, Tits, Power: The Films of Russ Meyer), Dolly Read-Martin (Kelly), Marcia McBroom (Pet), Erica Gavin (Roxanne), John Lazar (Ronnie "Z-Man" Barzell), Stu Phillips (Composer), and Lynn Carey (Vocals).

Joining Mike this week are Heather Drain and Jordan Blossey.

Listen/Download Now:


Bonus Interview: Stu Phillips


Links:
Buy Beyond the Valley of the Dolls on Blu-Ray
Buy the Beyond the Valley of the Dolls soundtrack
Buy Life Itself by Roger Ebert
Buy Lips Hips Tits Power: The Films Of Russ Meyer by Doyle Green
Buy Square Jaw and Big Heart - The Life and Times of a Hollywood Actor by Charles Napier
Visit the official Jim Rugg website
Donate to Boxes of Hope
Visit the official Erica Gavin website
Visit the official Stu Phillips website
Hear more of Lynn Carey on Soundcloud
Visit the official Lynn Carey/Mama Lion facebook page
Visit the BVOD Criterion page
Visit the official Edy Williams website
Read the Cease and Desist Memo

Music:
Come With The Gentle People (vocals by Lynn Carey and Barbara Robinson)
Find It - Stu Phillips & Lynn Carey
Sweet Talkin' Candy Man (vocals by Lynn Carey and Barbara Robinson)
Look On Up At The Bottom (vocals by Lynn Carey and Barbara Robinson)
Ampersand (&) - Stu Phillips
Candy Man - Mama Lion
Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls (vocals by The Sandpipers)
Look On Up At The Bottom - Redd Kross

Watch:






1 comment:

  1. It took two days to finish this, but I enjoyed every minute listening to it. The trailer for BVD that commences the episode is such a blast to listen to. It really mirrors the spirit of the movie.

    My first viewing of BVD was on the IFC channel a decade ago (before the commercials began), but I became aware of it when it aired late night on a subscription movie channel. Even though I could not watch it at the time, I was intrigued by the description of the movie in the tv schedule. The points all of you touched on- the editing, the colors, the music, the farcical story - immediately won me over. It is one the most unique cinematic experiences of my life.

    The number of interviews for the episode is wonderful. Each of them provides a little piece of the story of the movie's production process. The fact that you were able to interview most of the living cast members probably means that this podcast rivals the special features on the Blu-rays and DVDs. It is startling to realize that the cast are all at least in their late 60s.

    The part of the movie that always stands out to me is the moralizing summary of the characters at the conclusion. It never ceases to induce laughter.

    -A Longtime Listener





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